Dylan's Ph.D. Works on Viscoelastic Contact Interface

(Full Dissertation)



PART 1: Everything started from a sushi ...

Force relaxation is observed in a "sushi making machine". The contact force gradually decreased while a sushi was grasped and held in a fixed displacement, as the graph below.


Five stages, which are (1) loading, (2) nonlinear transition, (3) relaxation, (4) nolinear unloading and (5) creep, were characterized based on the force-displacement plots.
Reference
  1. N. Sakamoto, M. Higashimori, T. Tsuji and M. Kaneko*: An Optimum Design of Robotic Hand for Handling a Visco-elastic Object Based on Maxwell Model, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2007), (Roma, Italy, 2007.04), pp1219-1225.
  2. C. Tsai, I. Kao*, N. Sakamoto, M. Higashimori, and M. Kaneko: Applying Viscoelastic Contact Modeling to Grasping Task: an experimental case study, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS2008), (Nice, France, 2008.9.24), pp1790-1795. link
  3. Y. C. Fung*: Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, Springer-Verlag, 1992.



PART 2: The Latency Model - Internal structural rearrangement ...

To quantify the relaxation response, additional experiments were carried out with a compression test machine on different viscoelstic materials, such as silicone.





Clear movement of the marks on the silicone was observed (above), and a new model - "the latency model" based on internal structural rearrangement was proposed.


The latency model postulates that the internal rearrangement is the cause of the relaxation as contact interface gradually released from initial deformation. Computational simulations based on the latency model were performed as below.


The simulation results matched to the expectation as well as experimental results.


Two types of relaxation have been identified.

Reference
  1. C. Tsai, I. Kao*, M. Higashimori, and M. Kaneko: Modeling, Sensing and Interpretation of Viscoelastic Contact Interface, Journal of Advanced Robotics, vol. 26, no. 11-12, pp1393-1418, 2012. (SCI, IF=0.562)  link
  2. C. Tsai, I. Kao*, A. Shibata, K. Yoshimoto, M. Higashimori, and M. Kaneko: Experimental Study of Creep Response of Viscoelastic Contact Interface Under Force Control, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS2010), (Taipei, Taiwan, 2010.10.20), pp4257-4280. link
  3. C. Tsai, J. Nishiyama, I. Kao*, M. Higashimori, and M. Kaneko: Study of the Relationship Between the Strain and Strain Rate for Viscoelastic Contact Interface in Robotic Grasping, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS2010), (Taipei, Taiwan, 2010.10.19), pp592-597. link

PART 3: Applications of viscoelasticity in robotics and biomedical fields ...

While soft materials are generally considered as viscoelastic materials, the viscoelastic contact interface can be applied in various fields, such as grasping stability in robotics and deformability evaluation of biological materials.


A example of applications is shown above. A relatively soft and stiff red blood cells passing through the same microchannel. Clear difference in transit velocity can be observed due to different cell deformability. More applications in robotics and others can be found below.

Reference
  1. C. Tsai*, S. Sakuma, F. Arai and M. Kaneko: A New Dimensionless Index for Evaluating Cell Stiffness-based Deformability in Microchannel, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, vol.61, no.4, pp1187-1195, 2014 (SCI, IF=2.233) link
  2. I. G. Ramirez-Alpizar, M. Higashimori*, M. Kaneko, C. Tsai, and I. Kao: Dynamic Nonprehensile Manipulation for Rotating a Thin Deformable Object: an Analogy to Bipedal Gaits, IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol.28, no.3, pp607-618, 2012 . (SCI, IF=2.649) link
  3. I. G. Ramirez-Alpizar, M. Higashimori*, M. Kaneko, C. Tsai, and I. Kao: Nonprehensile Dynamic Manipulation of a Sheet-like Viscoelastic Object, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2011), (Shanghai, China, 2011.5), pp5103-5108. link
  4. J. Nishiyama, C. Tsai, M. Quigley, I. Kao*, A. Shibata, M. Higashimori, and M. Kaneko: An Experimental Study of Biologically Inspired Artificial Skin Sensor Under Static Loading and Dynamic Stimuli, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA2011), (Shanghai, China, 2011.5), pp1778-1783. link


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Last updated on 2016-02-19